The Grammar of the Archaeological Record
2. The Manual

4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

Giorgio Buccellati – June 2010

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.1: Input folders

A central aim of the Urkesh Global Record (UGR) is to go from an intuitive type of data entry to the full-fledged Browser Edition, with a display that is highly interactive. While intuitive, the process of data entry is rigorously (“grammatically”) regulated. It is only the application of such a “grammar” that makes the ultimate result possible. For this reason, the primary digital input is of the greatest importance.

Experience has satisfactorily shown that the rigor is not such as to impede effectiveness. The application of the data entry rules becomes quickly second nature for all (but the most recalcitrant…) staff members. Part of the reason for the success of the approach is that the programs have been developed in consonance with the establishment of the grammar, and coterminously with its application to the actual data. In other words, neither the grammar nor the programs have been imposed from without.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.2: Constituents, rosters and lexica

The backbone of the whole system consists in the proper definition of minimal constituents (elements, referents, and incidentals), and by lists of variables (rosters) and of variants (lexica). Since they are indispensable not only for data entry, but also for a proper understanding of the entire conceptual structure of the Urkesh Global Record (UGR) and for the Browser Edition, they are discussed at length in the Grammar. They will be assumed in what follows.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.3: Forms

Forms provide, in paper format, special configurations of a given roster and lexicon (and occasionally standards). They are tailor made to serve as a handy guide to data entry. The boxes given below reflect the top rows of these forms.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.4: Universal format constraints

gB, mKB, bLL

two or three characters, first lower case, others upper case

staff initials

mOmo, aHawwaz

one lower case letter, one upper case letter, one or more lower case letters

crew initials

<^

start of special hyperlink reference

see 4.4.1


^>

end of special hyperlink reference

see 4.4.1

$<$ … $>$

bypasses creation of hyperlink for constituents

see

-AAC, -OH10A

suffix to stratum (s1-JPA)

strata sequence

f2, f1234

lower case letter, followed by one to four digits

constituent


R301, Rx31

upper case letter, followed by either three digits or x/y/z and two digits

date

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.4.1: Special hyperlink

The character set <^ creates the first part of the hyperlink, extending till a space, and it is used either for incidentals or for left hand side files, as follows:

entry

HTML code

<^-SG

<A HREF=”\MZ\A\A16\D\-INCID\SG” target=B>

<^A2\OBJECTS.HTM

<A HREF=”\MZ\A\A16\TEXTS\A2\OBJECTS.HTM” target=B>



This is followed by the word that contains the hyperlink, followed in turn by the character set ^>. Thus the complete entries are as follows:

entry

HTML code

display

See <^-SG strategy^> under 2007-9-13

See <A HREF=”\MZ\A\A16\D\-INCID\SG” target=B> strategy</A> under 2007-9-13.

See strategy under 2007-9-13

See discussion about <^A2\OBJECTS.HTM objects^> in the left vertical bar

See discussion about <A HREF=”\MZ\A\A16\TEXTS\A2\OBJECTS.HTM” target=B> objects </A> in the left vertical bar.

See discussion about objects in the left vertical bar.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

In the following example, the image is given in the display; otherwise, the program would consider n7932 as a constituent. The closing $>$ is obligatory.

entry

HTML code

display

$<$<img src="../../images/dscn7932.jpg" width="150">$>$

<img src="../../images/dscn7932.jpg" width="150">

[gives actual image]

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.5: HTML codes

HTML codes may be entered anywhere as normal text. The most common codes are:

       <br> for carriage return within an entry

       <i> … </i> for italics

       <b> … </b> for bold

       &nbsp; for nonbreaking space

       &#8211; for N-dash


entry

HTML code

display

This is a <b>test</b> of <i>HTML</i> codes.<br>$nbsp;$nbsp;$nbsp;It is used to format text in display.

This is a <b>test</b> of <i>HTML</i> codes.<br>$nbsp;$nbsp;$nbsp;It is used to format text in display.

This is a test of HTML codes.

It is used to format text in display.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.6: Journal

[TEXT TO BE WRITTEN; ZGz05 mDP]

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.6.1: Diary, logs and lists

The term “journal” refers to all files produced manually, i.e., the primary digital input. Three distinct formats may co-occur at will within the same journal file: diary, logs and lists. Each format is described separately below (4.7, 4.8, and 4.9). First, I will describe the features that apply across the board to all journal files.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.6.2: Filenames

Filenames for the primary digital input are all limited to 8 alphanumeric characters. (It is different with secondary digital input, see below, chapter 5.)

Two extensions are possible:

  1. The extension .J is the normal one, and the pertinent files are placed in the I\J folder;
  2. The extension .R is used only for relays, and the pertinent files are placed in the I\R folder.

See presently for more details.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.6.3: Universal rules

Entries beginning with a semi-colon (;) or a single quote (’) can be entered anywhere and are ignored by the programs.

Within a normal text, constituents are identified by the program as lower case letters preceded by a space or punctuation (or placed at the beginning of an entry) and followed by a number, e.g.:

The following features (f20 and f21) …
     f20 and f21
     f20,f21
     This excludes combinations where a lower case letter is immediately preceded by another character, e.g., 2x2.
     If one wishes to have a lower case letter followed by a number, it should be preceded by the character ~. Thus w2 would be understood by the program as “drawing N. 2.” If another meaning is intended, e.g. “width 2,” then it must be entered as ~w2.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.6.4: Date and initials

The date must always be in the 4 character format, e.g. Q801 for August 1, 2006 (see also the charts of old and new year system).

Initials must always consist of either 2 or 3 alphanumeric characters. They must have a lower case letter in first position and an upper case letter in second position. The third position may have: blank, upper case letter, or a digit. Acceptable initials: gB, mKB, bM2 (the latter may stand for two individuals working together, with the appropriate resolution approved by the initial registrar).

It is illegal to have initials longer than three characters, or to combine initials, e.g. gB+mKB (apart from the so-called “joint-projects initials”).

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.6.5: File headers (with a dot in first position)

       Required

.bk A16

.fl Mx06lR.J

.fd q-objects (definition of file content)

.ed Mx06

.ei lr

.rd M920

.ri lr

       Optional

.fn file note describing in greater detail .fd

.en entry note describing particulars of data entry

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.6.6: .J files

These files provide the standard input called “journal” (hence the extension .J). J-files in the I\EXOGEN folder are all produced outside the unit book, but have the same format as the standard J-files. They are to be reviewed by the unit supervisors, and then copied to th I\J folder and processed like all other J-files.

As indicated above (4.6.1), a number of different formats are possible, and they can be mixed within the same file. It is however preferable to have different files for different types of content (such as daily journals and logs), only because it may be easier to keep track of them in both the recording and the proofreading phases.

The sample box below provides examples of each of the format subtypes that are allowed, namely the diary, the log and the list.

.bk A16

.fl M903lr.j

.fd journal

.ed M903

.ei lr


.rd M903

.ri lr


-dy Today we opened up A16 for season MZ15 and began by removing backfill and scraping the entire area to eliminate the outer coating of soil caused by the winter rains.

f 180

dy After reviewing the material from last season it has come to our attention that the tannur has not been relayed nor photographed. Today we cleaned the area around the tannur and scraped the walls around it for the photograph.

.bk Z1


i 398

df fg

w1 3.1

lg 4.7


.bk A16

.rd L715

.ri lr


f 1

B12 v1a


i

34^128 105^29^cv^^^^^^^ceramic vessel- The lower portion of a khabur jar in which the head of i31 (human skeleton) rested on.

80^237^110^665^ca^7^^^10.5^cl^^hind quarters of zoomorphic ceramic vessel


v

112^^NE^gk15 gf163^photo of k15 just prior to commencement of excavation showing a surface littered with small stones and sherds

113^^NW^gk5 gf164,165^photo of k5 just proir to commencement of excavation showing some large ashlar surface stones, f165 to the north of topsoil, f164, in the northern portion.

113a^t^NE^gk5 gf164,165^closeup of largest of a set of ashlar surface stones, f165, parts of which are above the topsoil, f164, in k5.

114^^E^gk5 gf165^photo showing the interferece between the A17/A18 dirt removal train and A14 operations in the vicinity of the northern most line of loci in the unit.

114a^t^E^gk5^closeup of train supports.


.bk ZS

.fl F608RAH

.fd storage

.ei rah

.ed F608


list1

l ^P2 29

A1.007

A1.014

A1.015

A1.018

A1.020

A1.021

A1q167-l

A1q181-g

A1q183-i

endlist


.bk A6

.fl E712W

.fd list of drawings

.fn Initials are those of Ibrahim Hellu. This file contains all items drawn for buildibg AK (i.e. A1, A5, A6). They are categorized by items and lots.

.rd E712

.ri ibr


list2

i ^rw

1 ^MB - C708

2 ^CH - C708

5 ^JB - D629

q73-o ^CLH - D727

q114-0 ^CLH - D702

q130-m ^JB - D629

endlist


.bk A16

.fl Mx06lr

.fd q-objects

.ed Mx06

.ei lr

.rd M920

.ri lr


q 842.2

df la

lg 4.5

w2 2.5

ds egg shaped lithic similar in shape to a sling ball. Solid piece of stone with the two ends smoothed and rounded.

zs b 16.22


.rd P818

.ri hh

q 47-p1

wm BC

qc 1

sh b

ZcaS1 r

ZcaS3 1

w1 16

ZcaM1 6%

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.6.7: .R files

Relays are entered in a separate directory (I\R), and are processed by a separate program (R) that produces a matching J-file. This file must then be processed by the J program.

F-6-R-J621  F6. Relay LOG (SAMPLE) MZ16(2003-N) Volume A20 r-log, page 15

Note: Standing on o1 and looking at o2, point being measured (relay) must be to your right.


rd

ri

constituent

relay

mm method of measureme

ntt=taped k=known

EITHER o1 orig of 1

OR nc North Coord

EITHER t1 Tie 1 (distance)

OR nc East coord

EITHER o2 orig of 2

OR kn known Elevation

t2 Tie2 (distance)

oe where elev measured

OR VCP elev

Differential above or below oe

if needed (negative if it is below)

te tie elevation

cl

Constituent Label

df

Definition

r relay

rf

relay def

rl

relay location


f82

a

179

see sketch 9

NW

Corner

t

2620

264

2621

280

m2621

10

140

f82

a

180

see sketch 9

SE

Corner

t

2620

352

2621

135

m2620

-30

140

i25

ma

186

tip of point

NE edge of f82

t

2599

433

2598

187

m2598

---

143

k5

surveyed

square

182

rebar stake

m2599

NW

Corner

k

44745

34456

8735

---

---

---

---



.bk A16

.fl L901lr.r

.fd relays

.ed L901

.ei lr


.rd L822

.ri lr


r

f199^ta^257^point in ta^center of ta^t^m2538^713^m2540^663^8774^^157

.rd L827

f209^pt^258^cut of pit^SW corner^t^m2538^273^m2540^546^m2538^46^60

f209^pt^259^cut of pit^SE corner^t^m2538^452^m2540^566^m2538^38^60

i53^se^262^item point^base of item^t^m2538^455^2540^62^m2538^36^60

.rd L829

.ri jlw

i55^bd^266^clear bead^center of item^t^m2538^277^m2540^447^m2538^15^133

i56^ma^267^spear point^north end^t^m2538^267^m2540^450^m2538^14^133

i57^ma^268^tip of fibula^metal pin^t^m2538^267^m2540^450^m2538^14^133

k111^lc^283^corner section^NE section edge^t^m2538^881^m2540^831^m2538^72^85

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.6.8: .G files

.bk J03

.fl P803gM.g

.fd plot of f3, f4, f5, f6, f9

.ei gM

.ed P803

.rd P803

.ri gM

l 9 11

;f3 extent

a 9 10 11 9

;f3 extent

l 12 13 14 15 12

;f6 perimeter

l 16 17 18 19 16

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.6.9: .M files

.bk Y1

.fl Q819jW3.m

.fd marker m4316

.fn surveyed by bp on Q819 and entered by jw on Q819

.ei jw

.ed Q819

.rd P819

.ri bp

4319 ^41081 ^48676 ^9172 ^MCP J3k22 temporary N baulk

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.7: Diary

The diary format is characterized by the lack of tabs. Instead, each entry (defined by a return at the end) is either a record header or a field within the record.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.7.1: Record headers

A record header is characterized by a single letter character in first position, a space, and a number. The number must follow the rules for constituents and components (for which see the Grammar). Following are some examples:

f 180

i 23

i 23.1

i 23.1.2

l A1.34 [l stands for an element label that includes the book prefix; it is equivalent to]

.bk A1

i 34]

q 1034

q 1034.1

q 1034.1.2

q 10-p4

[q 10-p4.10 not allowed]


For elements the maximum number of characters allowed is 4 (hence 9999 is the highest possible number), for components or subcomponents the maximum is 2 (hence 99 is the highest possible number).

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.7.2: Field within record (with double or multiple alphanumeric code in first position)

Following are samples of entries for individual fields. They must of course be preceded by the appropriate file and record headers.

       hyphen in first position (incidentals)
       – referring to entire book (no other element given above)

-dy Today we opened up A16 for season MZ15 and began by removing backfill and scraping the entire area to eliminate the outer coating of soil caused by the winter rains.

       two character lower case code (mnemonic)
       – referring to given element specified above

dy After reviewing the material from last season it has come to our attention that the tannur has not been relayed nor photographed. Today we cleaned the area around the tannur and scraped the walls around it for the photograph.

dy After reviewing the material from last season it has come to our attention that the tannur has not been relayed nor photographed. Today we cleaned the area around the tannur and scraped the walls around it for the photograph.

df la

lg 4.5

w1 3.2

       two or three character upper case code (roster sequence)
       – referring to given element specified above

N1 badly encrusted

B12 v1a

       Z in first position, five character upper/lower case code (special roster sequences)
       – referring to given element specified above

ZcaS1 r

ZcaS3 1

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.7.3: Fixed formats

Following is a list of examples for each of the fields with fixed format. The fields are listed in the sequential order of the roster. Entries with mnemonic codes are given immediately below the entry with the alphanumeric code.

Note that if nothing if available for numeric fields they must be left blank. Do not enter signs like – or ?.

Also note that local notes may be added to any fixed format field. They are introduced by space and the @ sign after the numeric entry.

B12 v1a

B12 L_V18d3519 J3.3 P818 gG.jpg

F02 ov 132

tc ov 132

F02 co 109

tc co 109

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.8: Logs

Shown below are the headings for the forms used in the field. Data entry follows exactly this format, with tabs between fields. Data can be entered into an Excel file, which is then exported as a tab-delimited, text file.

Codes for .rd and .ri may be entered only when either changes.

[yellow for features not currently in program]

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.8.1: Aggregates

.rd

.ri

a

k

df

>a

(elements with aggregate)

ds



a: sequential number of aggregate

k: locus where aggregate is found

df: definition of aggregate (e.g., pit)

>a: a list of elements contained within the aggregate, e.g.: f213,f197,f278,i115,i116. This list may explicitly include items and q-lots, but if these are already subsumed under a feature that is included in the aggregate, they should not be listed separately, since they will already be listed as a result of the SA program (below, 15.6). Thus items would typically be listed only when the aggregate includes items within a feature. – Makes sure you have a comma between all elements, and no spaces, thus: f213,f197,f278,i115,i116 and not f213,f197,f278 i115,i116.

ds: a more detailed description, or summary, of aggregate, e.g.: Cache of jars, bowls and cups, either resting on floor f213, or sitting in the living accumulations, f197 and f278, above it. The relative lack of whole vessels, the great variety of shapes and wares, and the presence of several piles of bitumen may indicate that this was a work area for the repair of damaged vessels.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.8.2: Features

f

k

df

s

el

P1

wm

co

c#

hd

tx

ds

@top

@bottom














Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.8.3: Items

.rd

.ri

i

f *

k

q

df

ht

lg

w1

w2

wm

sh

co

notes



f

k

q











The specifications for height, length, width 1, width 2, ware or material, shape and color need not be precise. They are meant to allow identification of the item in case the tag attached to it in the field were to get lost. Precise measurements will be taken after the item is cleaned in the lab.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.8.4: Loci

.rd

.ri

k

relay

cms

direction

cms

direction

description



D20

D21

B11


12

m3925

500N

500E



13

m3926

500N

500E

formerly J2k43


Note: The row highlighted in grey gives the roster codes created by the JD1-J program.

The two cm/dir columns refer to the length in centimeters of two contiguous sides, and to the direction of the side starting from the relay indicated in the preceding column. Thus 400/east and 400/north defines a square 4 meters on the side, with the convergence point of the two sides at the given relay.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.8.5: Q-lots

This is the front of the Q log form, which describes the q-lot proper.

.rd

.ri

q

df of

components

f *

Horizontal definition

Vertical definition

cms down



k

corner relay/

cms

EWNS

cms

EWNS

relay/marker or

______________

start elevation




wk, wf (whole locus, feature)

mrkr/el

differ

hi

comments





F2

D1

D20

D21

D22

D23

B11



3

p

2

12

r2

400E

400N

m3930

104

137

20




4

pb

3

12

r3

200E

200N

9472



20




5

pi

8

11

SE cornr

400W

400N

r144



20



     * By entering a feature number here, the program automatically assumes that the type of contact (tc) is “sits in” (si); if you need to indicate otherwise – e.g., “rests on” (re) – then leave this entry blank and write a separate journal entry.


Note: The row highlighted in grey gives the roster codes created by the JD1-J program.

df comp: definition of the components in lot (b,i, p)

cms ENWS: this indicates the size in centimeters of the lot sides: 400E means 400 cms east, etc.

start elev.: data for the top of the volume in which q-lot is contained

mrkr/el: either a marker is given (e.g., m3492, identified by the lower case m) or the absolute elevation (e.g., 9103, identified by a digit in first place).

differ: differential between elevation sighted and relay: with the "triangulation rod," this applies to a reading of a digit on the stadia rod placed vertically upon the relay; if the reading is taken from a sitewide elevation rod (with absolute elevations), then differential is 0.

hi: height of instrument: with "triangulation rod," this applies to the distance from the laser viewer to the bottom of the "triangulation rod."


The first line in the example above yields the following entry in the .E file that is generated by the JD2-E program.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.8.6: Q-items

This is the back of the Q-log form, which describes the components of any given lot, i.e. the Q-items, individual Q-sherds and individual Q-bones.

.rd

.ri

q-, q.

df

ht

lg

w1

w2

wm

sh

co

notes


For the typological specifications from height to color see the remarks already given above under 4.8.3 for items.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.8.7: Relays

Note: Standing on o1 and looking at o2, point being measured (relay) must be to your right.


rd

ri

constituent

relay

mm

meth-od

of

meas-ure-ment

t=

taped

k=

known


Either

o1

orig of 1


OR


nc

North

Coord




t1

Tie 1 (dis-

tance)


OR


nc

East

coord







Either

o2

orig of 2


OR


Known

Eleva-

tion





t2



Tie 2

(dis-

tance)



OR


VCP elev


oe

Where

elev measured



Different-ial

Ab-ove

oe

if need-ed

te

Tie

Eleva

tion

cl


Con-

stit-uent

Label



df


Def-

ini-

tion




r relay

rf

relay

def

rl

relay

location






D8

D9

D10

D14

D11

D15

D12

D13

D16


q105

p

274

K103

NW corner

t

4216

204

4215

162

m4216

106

162


f82

a

179

see sketch 9

NW

Corner

t

2620

264

2621

280

m2621

10

140

f82

a

180

see sketch 9

SE

Corner

t

2620

352

2621

135

m2620

30

140

k5

surveyed

square

181

rebar stake

m2598

SW

Corner

k

44245

34456

8785

-----

----

----

----

k5

surveyed

square

182

rebar stake

m2599

NW

Corner

k

44745

34456

8735

----

----

----

----

k5

surveyed

square

183

rebar stake

m2610

NE

Corner

k

44745

34956

8750

----

----

----

----

k5

surveyed

square

184

rebar stake

m2609

SE

Corner

k

44425

34956

8630

----

----

----

----

tcp1

Temporary control point

185

Wooden stake

base of of nail

t

2598

621

2599

650

8550

----

165

i25

ma

186

tip of point

NE edge of f82

t

2599

433

2598

187

m2598

34

143


The row highlighted in grey gives the codes generated by the R program.

The note in italics at the beginning of the form reminds the person taking the measurements that the relays must be taken in a set sequence.

The relay definition describes the point where the measurement is taken.

If the method of measurement is “taped,” then the following columns have different values than if the method is “known.”

For “taped,” o1 and o2 refer to the benchmark from which the measurement is taken, and t1 and t2 refer to the distance from the measured point to the benchmark. Similarly, or refers to the benchmark from which the elevation is measured, the differential is the reading on a stadia rod placed above the benchmark, and te refers to the height of instrument (i.e., the point where the laser viewer is placed and the base of the "triangulation rod").

The first line of data entry in the example above yield the following journal entry:

       r 274

       D4 39301

       D5 48302

       D6 9015

       D7 k103

       D8 q105

       D9 NW corner

       D10 t

       D11 4216

       D12 4215

       D13 m4216(9071)+106

       D14 204

       D15 162

       D16 162

       q 105

       D3 274 (39301 48302 - 9015 / Relay location: NW corner)

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.8.8: Strata assignment and definition

s

f

df

h

AAsE6 6-AAE

1,3,8,2

abandonment

7-AAE

AAsE6a 6a-AAE

4?

erosion

7-AAE

AAsE6-9 6-9-AAE

5

build-up

6-AAE


s: stratum label, followed by the strata sequence version. AA refers to the book (it might be replaced by the current Book, e.g. A12). E refers to the generation of the strata definition (see above, 4.4).

f: the features contained in this stratum. The format is as indicated, without the prefix f, and with commas separating each entry. A question mark indicates that the assignment of a given feature to a given stratum is uncertain.

df: the definition of the stratum. A longer description would be entered through the regular diary format.

h: the phase to which the stratum belongs.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.8.9: Views and drawings

Note: “g” stands for “graphic” to subsume both views and drawings.

.rd

.ri

v / w

View/

Drawing

Seq.#

gr

Range

go

Orientation

ga/gf/gi/gq/gk/gm (for markers)/gr (for relays) –

List of elements in view or drawing

(e.g.: gf32,12,4 gi89 gm4123)

ds

text description of view or drawing

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.9: Lists

Lists provide a shortcut to enter repetitive data.

Data entry for logs is similar, except that in the case of the logs, a list format is assumed and the repetitive elements need not be spelled out.

With a list, instead, the repetitive elements are spelled out at the beginning.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.9.1: List 1

       The first type of list allows for the same field to be added to a number of different elements. Thus, instead of entering:

       A1.7

       P2 29

       l A1.14

       P2 29

       etc.

one can enter the following list:

       .bk ZS

       .fl F608RAH

       .fd storage

       .ei rah

       .ed F608


       list1

       l ^P2 29


       A1.7

       A1.14

       A1.15

       A1.18

       A1.20

       A1.21

       A1q167-l

       A1q181-g

       A1q183-i

       endlist


       list1

       l ^^P2 30

       A5q143.l

       A5q147.l

       A5q149

       B1.127

       B1.128

       B1.129

       B1.136

       BHq528.1

       BHq545

       F1.-1

       F1.17

       F1.30

       F1.38

       endlist

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.9.2: List 2

       The second type of list allows for multiple tabbed entries (highlighted below by ^) to refer to a given set of field headers. Thus instead of entering:

       l A1.8

       O2 E4804

       l A1.20

       O2 E6011

       ph this photo shows detail well

       O2 E4102

       ph E6011 is better for detail

       etc.

       one can enter the following list:

       .bk ZZ

       .fl F522-LPH.J

       .fd list of photos from prints

       .fn entered in Vienna

       .ei gb

       .ed F515


       list2

       l ^O2 ^ph


       A1.8 ^E4804

       A1.20 ^E6011 ^this photo shows detail well

       A1.20 ^E4102 ^E6011 is better for detail

       A5.10 ^E4612

       A5.10 ^E46(??)

       A5.25 ^E4807

       A5.25 ^E4809

       A5.30 ^E4711

       A5.34 ^E1512

       A5.37 ^B0716

       A5.42 ^E0309

       A5.46 ^E6609

       A5.46 ^E6510

       endlist


       list2

       q ^P2

       3.1 ^ZSB24-1

       4.1 ^ZSB25.1

       endlist


       .bk J02

       .fl Py15gB.j

       .fd justification for strata assignment, based on Time Sequencing Log P914mH.txt

       .ed Py15

       .ei gB

       .rd P914

       .ri mH


       list2

       f ^I10 ^I11 ^I12


127 ^Built partly on top of f131 (1st apron) and thus is structurally later although not necessarily later in time. It is clearly built on a slope, which indicates that it sits on the glacis abutting the terrace wall f128. Accumulations dated to Phase 1 with pottery abut it. ^ ^

128 ^Accumulations dated to Phase 1 based on recovered pottery abut it. ^ ^Terrace wall. Must be structurally earlier than the apron (f131), pebble floors in k100 and the at least the three bottom steps visible in k100.

       endlist

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.10: Texts

     Descriptive narratives that encompass several elements are stored as normal text files that can be hyperlinked as needed. These files differ from incidentals, in that they can be referred to individually through hyperlinks.

     The hyperlink is given as desired under any pertinent element. It is in fixed format, and it consists only of the pertinent file label. The roster code is lf followed by the file label (see presently).

     The first time a text file is entered, it must be preceded by a constituent to which it refers (hence, it is not allowed after incidentals). In other words, each text file must be pertinent to at least one constituent. For other constituents (generally those mentioned in the text file itself) one must enter manually an lf entry for each pertinent constituent.

     Note that one cannot place an lf entry before one enters the actual text file. Otherwise the program will give an error message and it will terminate.

     The text file itself can be entered anywhere in a journal file. It begins with text and it ends with endtext.

     The .rd and the .ri data are obtained automatically from the current journal file label.

     Immediately following text is the file label. This follows the same criteria as the .J files, but uses the extension .T. The text file is placed by the program under O\-TXT. It is then processed and placed under D\-TXT with extension .HTM.

     The next line contains a brief descriptive title. This is the one that will be found in the pull down menu in the Browser Edition. It should be short enough for the pull down menu.

     The text itself is entered as normal text, with tabs required at the beginning of each paragraph. Internal references to elements (e.g., f31) will be automatically hyperlinked. To highlight words use the following codes before and after each string:

       <b>string</b> for bold

       <i>string</i> for italic

       <u>string</u> for underline

     Following is a sample journal entry:


.bk J02

.fl O706mh.j

.fd daily journal O706

.ed O706

.ei mh


.rd O706

.ei mh


f 31

df ld

ds Soil layer in the eastern side of k13 associated with the large stone near the northern baulk. The soil is still the result of natural accumulation, but since we apparently started reaching the stones of the "apron" I considered it appropriate to separate soils starting from this elevation from those above. The soil matrix still consists of patches of harder and softer soil.


text O706mH.T

Soil layers

Our targets for the book (the stones for the possible apron, temple terrace wall, the plaza level) are most likely located under a few meters or even several meters of soil. The soil we have excavated thus far (e.g., f31) has been natural accumulation and includes patches of softer and harder soil. The harder patches could perhaps be melted brick material but there are not well defined pieces of brick. The soil also does not have any distinct color. fAB mentioned that the temple terrace to the north of the unit is constructed of very distinct red soil. The terrace cannot be the source of the accumulation in our unit since this accumulation is clearly not red.

This begs the questions where did all of this soil come from. While some of it certainly can be wind-blown, I would maintain that not all of it is. I doubt the soil would have packed in patches like it has if all of it was wind-blown and subject to similar natural forces. Perhaps some of it is erosion <i>from later structures surrounding the plaza</i>. In J01 East of MZ16 the soil layers they excavated through were uniformly hard. Perhaps the soil there is all the result of wind erosion. J02 is perhaps closer to later structures (like the structures to the south of J02) than the more central area of the plaza.

endtext


f 32

lf O706mH.T


The output in O\-TXT\O706mH.T is as follows:


O706mH.T

rd O706

ri mh

Soil layers

Our targets for the book (the stones for the possible apron, temple terrace wall, the plaza level) are most likely located under a few meters or even several meters of soil. The soil we have excavated thus far (e.g., f31) has been natural accumulation and includes patches of softer and harder soil. The harder patches could perhaps be melted brick material but there are not well defined pieces of brick. The soil also does not have any distinct color. fAB mentioned that the temple terrace to the north of the unit is constructed of very distinct red soil. The terrace cannot be the source of the accumulation in our unit since this accumulation is clearly not red.

This begs the questions where did all of this soil come from. While some of it certainly can be wind-blown, I would maintain that not all of it is. I doubt the soil would have packed in patches like it has if all of it was wind-blown and subject to similar natural forces. Perhaps some of it is erosion <i>from later structures surrounding the plaza</i>. In J01 East of MZ16 the soil layers they excavated through were uniformly hard. Perhaps the soil there is all the result of wind erosion. J02 is perhaps closer to later structures (like the structures to the south of J02) than the more central area of the plaza.

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.11: Exogenous files

standard label format: OH02AR8m

OH02: book

A: type of source

R8m: contracted date


list of infixes:

A: physical anthropology

B: animal bones

C: conservation

E: epigraphy

G: glyptic

P: pottery

S: storage

T: transfer (e.g. Museum list)

V: photography

W: drawings

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.12: Sample J-files

[TEXT TO BE WRITTEN; ZGz05 mDP]

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually

4.12.1: Templates

       .bk A16

       .fl TMPL-P6o.J

       .fd templates as of 06-24-2005


       .rd P624

       .ri !!


       v 1

       O00 A16t0001 V14d4001 M726 lr.jpg

       v 1a

       O00 A16t0001a V14d4002 M726 lr.jpg

       v 1b

       O00 A16t0001b V14d4003 M726 lr.jpg

Back to top: 4. Primary Input: Files entered Manually