E-LIBRARY / OTHER PUBLICATIONS / Urkesh specific / 921a.htm
G. Buccellati, 2002-2010.
L. Recht, 2013-2017.
M. De Pietri, 2018-.
.


Alphabetic bibliography of Urkesh and the Hurrians

     Publications by colleagues, formally not included in Urkesh's team. Authors are listed alphabetically, and under each author's name the titles are listed chronologically.
     Where a full digital version is available online, a reference to the proper link is given [last accessed on 15/08/2019].
     For publications which deal more extensively, as a whole or in part, with Urkesh, our website provides an abstract. For some others, a brief précis (in smaller type) or a direct quote from the publication itself is given below the title, occasionally followed (in square brackets) by a comment.
     When a review of a publication is available, it is indicated within curly brackets, with the link to the review itself.


     A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Abbati, degli Valeria
2009-2010 “Le scene di lotta come emblemi di potere nella dinastia di Akkad alla nascita del 'Primo impero universale',”
M.G. Biga, J.Ma Córdoba, C. del Cerro and E. Torres (eds.), Homenaje a Mario Liverani, fundador de una ciencia nueva (I) / Omaggio a Mario Liverani, fondatore di una nuova scienza (I),
ISIMU 11-12, pp. 159-176.
See full text
“The transition between Early Dynastic and Akkadian Periods brought deep changes to the Ancient Near Eastern culture and politics. The expansion of the boundaries and the complexity of relations with neighboring populations involved a new kind of kinship, centered on a warrior, valorous and almost heroic king. Epic cycles started, telling about the extraordinary deeds of Akkadian kings, described almost exclusively as invincible warriors. The repercussions of this change are evident even in the material production, specifically in the cylinder seals. Indeed most of these decorations have contest scenes with men, gods, mythical beings and animals. This kind of iconography starts in Early Dynastic Period and is completely reworked in Akkadian Period, both technologically and stylistically, becoming some kind of dynastic emblem in which the new features are imposed in the artistic panorama of the countries subjected to the power of Akkad” [adapted from author's abstract].
[mDP – December 2019]


2011 “Riflessioni storiche su un sigillo di epoca akkadica,”
La parola del passato. Rivista di studi antichi 378, pp. 188-193.
See full text
See abstract
The papers investigates the identity and the historical importance of Tar’am-Agade (daughter of Naram-Sin, king of Akkad), according to data retrieved on a sealing from Urkesh (AOD 42). Furthermore, the author discusses the peculiar use at Urkesh of the title endan to qualify the local king.
[mDP – October 2019]

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Agnew, Neville and Martha Demas
2019 “Integrating Conservation, Archaeology, and Community at Tell Mozan (Urkesh),”
in SANEM 3, pp. 15-20.
See full text
“The conservation model for archaeology that emerged in the 1970s as a response to loss of sites was a seminal development in the practice of archaeology. In the present era of challenges, the integration of conservation, archaeology and community at Tell Mozan exemplifies a compelling evolution of the model for excavated sites” (authors' abstract on p. 15).
[mDP – August 2020]

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Akkermans, Peter M.M. and G. Schwartz
2003 The Archaeology of Syria.
From Complex Hunter-Gatherers to Early Urban Societies (ca. 16,000-300 BC).

Cambridge World Archaeology.
Cambridge: University Press.
See preview on Google Books
See abstract
The authors of the present paper discusses the development of urbanization in ancient Syria, stressing how it reached an end at the beginning of the third millennium BC. This situation seems not to have affected some major sites in Northern Syria, such as Urkesh and Tell Chuera: as for Tell Mozan, the developinig of a monumental architecture on the top of the mound in the very same period hint to a better situation in the area, probably led by the very same site of Urkesh.
[gB – December 2005]

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Albenda, Pauline
2005 “The 'Queen of the Night' Plaque – A Revisit,”
JAOS 125/2, pp. 171-190.
See full text
Alternative online version [JSTOR]
Alternative online version [Academia.edu]
See abstract
This paper deals with the iconographic analysis of a clay plaque formerly known as “the Burney Relief” (British Museum 2003,0718.1), depicting a goddess defined in literature as the “Queen of the Night”. Urkesh is specifically quoted on p. 185 (see abstract), where the author compares some features of the two recumbent lions on the plaque with the two famous lion-pegs of Tiš-atal.
[mDP – February 2020]

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Archi, Alfonso
2013 “The West Hurrian Pantheon and its Background,”
in Billie J. Collins and Piotr Michalowski (eds.), Beyond Hatti. A Tribute to gary Beckman, Atlanta: Lockwood Press, pp. 1-21.
See full text
Alternative online version [Academia.edu]
See abstract
The present contribution offers an overview on the Hurrian pantheon as it can be reconstrucyed on the basis of Hurro-Huttite mythological texts, and other various documentation (such as texts from Nuzi, Alalakh, Tell Leilan, Ebla, Ugarit, and Amarna. Moreover, Sumero-Akkadian influnce on religion is investigated, together with the use of epithets to determine specific divinities. – Urkesh is specifically quoted on pp. 4 (mentioning Tiš-atal, Atal-šen, and Tupkiš), 5 (about the title endan), and 7 (on Kumarbi); particularly noterworthy is the mention of Urkesh on p. 8, note 43, reporting G. Buccellati's suggestion about the possible reading of dKIŠ.GAL/dKIŠ.UNU.GAL as 'Kumarbi' (see abstract for the quotation of the passage).
[mDP – February 2020]


2019 “Šamagan and the Mules of Ebla Syrian Gods in Sumerian Disguise,”
in SANEM 3, pp. 38-55.
See full text
“The scene on a seal from Urkiš represents an equid jumping toward a seating god, who may be identified with Šamagan, the deity of the steppe animals also at Ebla, and a major one at Nabada (Tell Beydar). This proves that Šamagan was a god of Northern Mesopotamia. Ebla imported mules from Nagar (Tell Brāk): hybrids obtained in the regions east of the Ḫabur crossing onagers with female asses” [Author's abstract on p. 38].
[mDP – February 2022]

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Astour, Michael C.
2002 “A Reconstruction of the History of Ebla (Part 2),”
Eblaitica; Essays on the Ebla Archives and Eblaite Language 4, pp. 57-195.
See abstract
The paper briefly refers to Urkesh in a passage of an inscription from Ebla mentioning “Tiš-atal, ruler of Urgiš”.
[gB – June 2002]

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Barrelet, Marie-Thérèse
1977 “Le 'Cas' hurrite et la pratique archeologique,”
in Methodologie et critique I: Problèmes concernent les Hurrites. Paris, pp. 1-20.
The present contribution deals in general with the ethnicity of Hurrian people, discussing both methodological issues and actual archaeological and textual elements hinting to the identification of a specific ethnic group which eventually ended in the constitution of the 'kingdom of Mittani'.
[mDP – November 2019]


1978 “Le 'cas hurrite' et l'archéologie,”
Revue Hittite et Asianique 36, pp. 23-24.
See full text
See abstract
The basic topic of the present paper deals with the identification of Hurrian ethnicity, firstly addressing a methodological question on how archaeologists perceive the 'Hurrian problem' (or, maybe better, the 'enquiry about Hurrians').
[mDP – October 2019]

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Berlyn, Patricia
2005 “The Journey of Terah: To Ur-Kasdim or Urkesh?”
Jewsih Bible Quarterly 33/2, pp. 73-80.
See full text
Alternative online version
See abstract
This contribution mentions Urkesh in connection with Abraham's family, suggesting an equation of Urkesh with Terah's homeland, i.e. Ur-Kesh, read as 'Ur of the Chaldee'. The author also discusses the possible location of ancient Urkesh.
[gB – May 2008]

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Bianchi, Alice
2012 Comparative Studies on the Pottery of Sector AK of the Royal Building in Tall Mozan/Urkeš (Syria).
Studien zur Urbanisierung Nordmesopotamiens Supplement
Serie D Band 2.
Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz.
Publisher webpage
Table of contents
This volume is wholly devoted to the presentation and comparative studies of the pottery coming from Sector AK of the Royal Palace of Tell-Mozan/Urkesh, according to data of the 1998-2001 excavation seasons.
{Review in Rova 2013}.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Bianchi, Alice and Anne Wissing
2009 Ausgrabungen 1998-2001 in der Zentralen Oberstadt von Tall Mozan/Urkeš.
Die Kleinfunde.

Studien zur Urbanisierung Nordmesopotamiens Serie A, Band 2.
Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz.
Publisher webpage
Table of contents
This volume is wholly devoted to the presentation of the small finds found in the so-called 'Zentralen Oberstadt' of Tell-Mozan/Urkesh, during the 1998-2001 excavation seasons.
[mDP – January 2020]

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Bianchi, Alice, Heike Dohmann-Pfälzner, E. Geith, Peter Pfälzner and Anne Wissing
2012 Ausgrabungen 1998-2001 in der Zentralen Oberstadt von Tall Mozan/Urkeš.
Die Arkitektur und Stratigraphie.

Studien zur Urbanisierung Nordmesopotamiens
Serie A, Band 1.
Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz.
Publisher webpage
Table of contents
See abstract
This volume is wholly devoted to the presentation of the architecture and the stratigraphy of the “Upper-city” of Tell-Mozan/Urkesh, resulting from the 1998-2001 excavation seasons.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Bietak, Manfred
2018 “The giparu of Ur as a paradigm for gender-related temple types in the ancient Near East,”
in J. Aviram, A. Ben-Tor, J. Magness, E. Stern, Lawrence E. Stager Volume.
Eretz-Israel 33.
Jerusalem: Hebrew University of Jerusalem, pp. 9*-24*.
See full text
See abstract
The author compares in this paper different structures which resembles that of the so-called giparu at Ur; Urkesh is specifically mentioned as regards the 'Bent-Axis' temple of the city (better known as Temple BA).
[mDP – January 2019]

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Bottéro, Jean
1971 “Relations with Mesopotamia. Syria during the Third Dynasty of Ur,”
CAH 1/2, pp. 559-566.
See full text
See abstract
A chapter devoted to the display of Syrian history during the Ur III period: mentions of Tell Mozan on p. 565 (regarding Hurrian people in Upper Syria).
[mDP – July 2019]

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Camatta, Patrizia and Juliane Goischke
2010 “Tell Mozan/Urkesh, Syrien. Bauarchäologische Untersuchung der Tempelterrasse,”
Masterstudium Denkmalpflege der Technischen Universität Berlin 6, p. 91.
See full text
The authors present here the results of recent investigation on the architectural remains of the 'Temple Terrace' of Urkesh. This topic has been further explored, later on, in a Master thesis entitled: Tell Mozan/Urkesh, Syria. Architectural Research in the Archaeological Context of the Temple Terrace, submitted by P. Camatta at the Freie Universität Berlin.
[mDP – March 2020]

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Canby, Jeanny Vorys
2003 “A Figurine From Urkesh: A 'Darling' From Troy to Mesopotamia,”
Iraq 65, pp. 171-173.
See full text
See abstract
The author presents a lead figurine from Urkesh (A9.86) representing a woman and compared with similar objects exchanged by merchants travelling from Mesopotamia to Anatolia.
[mDP – November 2019]

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Catagnoti, Amalia
1998 “The III Millennium Personal Names from the Habur Triangle in the Ebla, Brak and Mozan Texts,”
Subartu 4.1, pp. 41-66.
See full text
See abstract
The paper presents a list of many personal names attested in third millennium BC documentation from the Khabur region, mentioning also anthroponyms from Urkesh.
[gB – December 2005]

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Caubet, Annie and Patrick Pouyssegur
1997 The Origins of Civilization. The Ancient Near East.
Paris: Finest/Terrail, 1998 [original French edition: 1997].
See abstract
A section of this book deals with Hurrian entities, mentioning Urkesh as one of the most important places inhabited by Hurrians.
[gB – June 2002]

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Christie, Agatha
1977 Come, Tell Me How You Live.
New York [first published in 1946].
See abstract
A book retrieving the excavations and surveys of M. Mallowan in Upper Syria between ca. 1936 and 1938: also Urkesh and other sites in the nearby were interested (for the first time ever) by his investigations.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Collins, Billie Jean
2004 “A Channel to the Underworld in Syria,”
Near Eastern Archaeology 67.1, pp. 54-56.
See full text
See abstract
This brief article summarises one of the main discoveries made the Urkesh team in 1999, i.e. the necromantic pit better known as ābi, describing its structure and possible religious function.
[mDP – November 2019]

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Crawford, Vaughn, Prudence O. Harper, Oscar W. Muscarella and Beatrice E. Bodenstein
1966 The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Guide to the Collections, Ancient Near Eastern Art.

New York: MET Publications.
See full text
Online version of MET
See abstract
This book represents a guide to the Near Eastern collection of the MET, including artefacts from the Early Anatolian to the Sasanian periods (i.e., ca. 6500 BC-651 AD). Urkesh's lion-shaped peg is also included in this catalogue.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Dalley, Stephanie
2001 “Old Babylonian Tablets from Nineveh, and Possible Pieces of Early Gilgamesh Epic,”
Iraq 63, pp. 155-167.
See full text [JSTOR]
See abstract
A paper dealing with literary topics related to the epos of Gilgaseh, briefly reporting at the beginning the history of Nineveh. Urkesh's king Tish-atal is also mentioned in the contribution.
[gB – June 2002]

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Deckers, Katkleen, Monika Doll, Peter Pfälzner and Simone Riehl
2010 Ausgrabungen 1998-2001 in der Zentralen Oberstadt von Tall Mozan/Urkeš.
Development of the Environment, Subsistence and Settlement of the City of Urkeš and Its Region.

Studien zur Urbanisierung Nordmesopotamiens Serie A Vol. 3.
Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz.
Publisher webpage
Table of contents
See abstract
This publication explains the development of the environment, the subsistence and the settlement of Tell-Mozan/Urkesh and its region, after the 1998-2001 excavation seasons.
[mDP – July 2019]

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degli Abbati, Valeria
2009-2010 “Le scene di lotta come emblemi di potere nella dinastia di Akkad alla nascita del 'Primo impero universale',”
M.G. Biga, J.Ma Córdoba, C. del Cerro and E. Torres (eds.), Homenaje a Mario Liverani, fundador de una ciencia nueva (I) / Omaggio a Mario Liverani, fondatore di una nuova scienza (I),
ISIMU 11-12, pp. 159-176.
See full text
“The transition between Early Dynastic and Akkadian Periods brought deep changes to the Ancient Near Eastern culture and politics. The expansion of the boundaries and the complexity of relations with neighboring populations involved a new kind of kinship, centered on a warrior, valorous and almost heroic king. Epic cycles started, telling about the extraordinary deeds of Akkadian kings, described almost exclusively as invincible warriors. The repercussions of this change are evident even in the material production, specifically in the cylinder seals. Indeed most of these decorations have contest scenes with men, gods, mythical beings and animals. This kind of iconography starts in Early Dynastic Period and is completely reworked in Akkadian Period, both technologically and stylistically, becoming some kind of dynastic emblem in which the new features are imposed in the artistic panorama of the countries subjected to the power of Akkad” [adapted from author's abstract].
[mDP – December 2019]

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Dercksen, Jan G. (ed.)
2008 Anatolia and the Jazira During the Old Assyrian Period.
Leiden: Nederlands Instituut voor het Nabije Oosten.
Publisher webpage
See full text
See abstract
This volume collects many contributions about the political, geographical and social situation in Anatolia and the Assyrian Jazira during the Old Assyrian period.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Dilleman, Louis
1962 Haute Mésopotamie orientale et pays adjacent.
Contribution à la géographie historique de la région, du Ve s. avant l'ère chrétienne au VIe s. de cette ère.

Institut Français d'Archéologique et Historique, vol. 72.
Paris: Paul Geuthner.
Publisher webpage
See abstract
The volume (divided into four parts) describes the historical geography of ancient Upper Mesopotamia, trying to reconstruct ancient trades and routes.
[mDP – October 2019]

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Dohmann-Pfälzner, Heike & Peter Pfälzner
1999 “Ausgrabungen der Deutschen Orient-Gesellschaft in Tall Mozan/Urkeš.
Bericht über die Vorkampagne 1998,”

MDOG 131, pp. 17-46.

2000 “Ausgrabungen der Deutschen Orient-Gesellschaft in der zentralen Oberstadt von Tall Mozan/Urkeš.
Bericht über die in Kooperation mit dem IIMAS durchgeführte Kampagne 1999,”

MDOG 132, pp. 185-228.
See full text
See abstract
Final report on the 1999 excavation season of the DOG and IIMAS (10th August-30th September) at Tell Mozan/Urkesh.
[mDP – July 2019]

2001 “Ausgrabungen der Deutschen Orient-Gesellschaft in der zentralen Oberstadt von Tall Mozan/Urkeš.
Bericht über die in Kooperation mit dem IIMAS durchgeführte Kampagne 2000,”

MDOG 133, pp. 97-140.
See full text (German)
See full text (English)
See abstract
The authors present in this publication the results about the DOG/IIMAS excavation season at Tell Mozan in 2000.
[mDP – July 2019]

2002 “Ausgrabungen der Deutschen Orient-Gesellschaft in der zentralen Oberstadt von Tall Mozan/Urkeš.
Bericht über die in Kooperation mit dem IIMAS durchgeführte Kampagne 2001,”

MDOG 134, pp. 149-192.
See full text
See abstract
The present paper offers a wide summary on the results of the DOG (Berlin) excavation season at Tell Mozan in 2001, in cooperation with the IMAAS (UCLA, Los Angeles).
[mDP – October 2019]

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Dolce, Rita
1999 “Political Supremacy and Cultural Supremacy.
A Hypothesis of Symmetrical Alternations between Upper Mesopotamia and Northern Syria in the Fourth and Third Millenia BC,”

in L. Milano (ed.), Landscapes: Territories, Frontiers and Horizons in the Ancient Near East. Papers presented to the XLIV Rencontre Assyriologique Internationale, Venezia 7-11 July 1997. Vol. 2: Geography and Cultural Landscapes
History of the Ancient Near East Monographs
.
Padova: Eisenbrauns, pp. 103-121.
See abstract
Two mentions to Urkesh are reported in this paper, dealing with the political and geographical situation in Upper Mesopotamia and Northern Syria in the fourth and third millennia BC.
[gB – June 2002]

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Doll, Monika
2010 “Meat, Traction, Wool: Urban Livestock in Tell Mozan,”
in K. Deckers, M. Doll, P. Pfälzner, and S. Riehl (eds), Development of the Environment, Subsistence, and Settlement of the City of Urkeš and Its Region,
Studien zur Urbanisierung Nordmesopotamiens. Ausgrabungen 1998-2001 in der zentralen Oberstadt von Tall Mozan/Urkeš. SUN Serie A, Band 3,
Harrassowitz: Wiesbaden, pp. 191-360.
A paper discussing different archaeozoological evidences from Tell Mozan/Urkeš.
[mDP – June 2022]

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Edzard, Dietz O. and Gertrud Farber
1974 Répertoire géographique des Textes Cunéiformes. Band 2.
Die Orts- und Gewässernames der Zeit der 3. Dynastie von Ur.

Wiesbaden: L. Reichert.
See abstract
The volume collects the textual mentions of the city of Urkesh/Tell Mozan in ancient Near Eastern documentation.
[mDP – October 2019]

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Edzard, Dietz O., Gertrud Farber and Edmond Sollberger
1977 Répertoire géographique des Textes Cunéiformes. Band 1.
Die Orts- und Gewässernames der präsargonischen und sargonischen Zeit.

Wiesbaden: L. Reichert.
See abstract
The volume collects the textual mentions of the city of Urkesh/Tell Mozan in ancient Near Eastern documentation.
[mDP – October 2019]

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Edzard, Dietz O. and Annelies Kammenhuber
1972-1975 “Hurriter, Hurritisch,”
RLA 4, pp. 507-514.
See full text
See abstract
The starting-point source for a research about the Hurrians and the Hurrian language where the authors present the main topics about Hurrian culture.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Ellis, Richard
1968 Foundation Deposits in Ancient Mesopotamia.
New Haven: Yale University Press.

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Faivre, Xavier and Christophe Nicolle
2007 “La Jézireh au Bronze moyen et la céramique du Khabur,”
in Michel al-Maqdissi, Valérie Matoïan and Christophe Nicolle,
Céramique de l'âge du Bronze en Syrie.
Beyrouth, Institut Français du Proche-Orient, vol. II, pp. 179-229.
See preview on Google Books
See abstract
A paper devoted to the presentation and the analysis of the main ceramic typologies of the Khabur valley during the Middle Bronze Age.
[gB – April 2009]

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Fournet, Arnaud
2015 Lions d'Urkeš et cunéiforme éblaïte.
Lille: The Book Edition [ISBN: 979-10-92354-36-2].
ToC
This book is devoted to the analysis of the two Lions bronze statuettes related to Urkesh (today at the Louvre Museum, AO 19937, and at the Metropolitan Museum, MMA 48.180) and specifically of the tablet (kept at the Louvre Museum, AO 19938) carrying an inscription in Hurrian with the dedication of a temple to the god Kumarbi, comparing the Hurrian cuneiform set of signs with that of the Eblaite language.
The book is useful for its first section (chs. 1-2), an introduction to cuneiform and cuneiform tradition in Mesopotamia. The second section (ch. 3) is interesting for the history of the two lions and the following researches on the inscription on tablet AO 19938; the third section (chs. 4-6), presenting an analysis of the inscription together with a comparison between the Hurrian and Eblaite cuneiform systems, is scientifically poorly grounded and must be therefore read with caution. [mDP – February 2021]

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Gadd, Cyril J.
1940 “Tablets from Chagar Bazar and Tall Brak, 1937-38,”
Iraq 7, pp. 22-66.
See full text [JSTOR]
See abstract
This paper aims at publishing all the written tablets and the fragments found at Chagar Bazar and Tall Brak by Mallowan in 1937-38.
[mDP – July 2019]

1971 “Babylonia c. 2120-1800 B.C.,”
CAH 1/2, pp. 595-643.
See full text
See abstract
This chapter of the CAH [Cambridge Ancient History] (no. 22) is devoted to the presentation of the history of Babylonia between ca. 21-20 and 1800 BC.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Gelb, Ignace J.
1944 Hurrians and Subarians.
SAOC 22.
Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
See full text
See abstract
This volume was one of the first works about the problem of the identification of Hurrian and Subarians people and the relationships between them.
[mDP – July 2019]


1956 “New Light on Hurrians and Subarians,”
in Studi orientalistici in onore di Giorgio Levi della Vida.
Pubblicazioni dell'Istituto per l'Oriente, 52 [2 vols.].
Roma: Instituto per l'Oriente, vol. 1, pp. 378-92.

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Giorgieri, Mauro
2000a “Schizzo grammaticale della lingua Hurrica,”
La civilità dei Hurriti = La parola del passato 55, pp. 171-277.
Napoli: Macchiaroli editore.
See full text [Academia.edu]
See abstract
This brief but omni-comprehensive grammar of the Hurrian language offers a complete overview on all the aspects of this topic; the grammar is mostly based on the features on the so-called “Letter of Mittani”, the longest (500 lines) and better understandable Hurrian document, surely written directly by Hurrian scribes.
[mDP – July 2019]


2000b “L’onomastica hurrita,”
La civilità dei Hurriti = La parola del passato 55, pp. 278-295.
Napoli: Macchiaroli editore.
See abstract
In this brief contribution, the present author offers an overview on the Hurrian onomastic system, presenting a chronology and a geographical distribution of the sources, an discussion on Hurrian Satznamen, Bezeichnungsnamen and toponyms.
[mDP – November 2019]


2013 “Diffusion et caractéristiques de la culture écrite d'origine hourrite dans le Proche-Orient asiatique et à Ougarit,”
in P. Bordreuil, F. Ernst-Pradal, M. G. Masetti-Rouault, H. Rouillard-Bonraisin, M. Zink (eds.),
Les écritures mises au jour sur le site antique d'Ougarit (Syrie) et leur déchiffrement.
Paris: Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres, pp. 157-185.
See full text
See abstract
The author presents an overview on the Hurrian texts found at Ugarit/Ras Shamra, particularly focusing on both the syllabic and alphabetical cuneiform sources (dated between the mid-3rd and the end of the 2nd millennium BC), mostly represented by religious compositions and peculiar (as well as unique) musical texts.
[mDP – January 2019]

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Goetze, Albrecht
1953 “An Old Babylonian Itinerary,”
JCS 7.2, pp. 51-71.
See full text [JSTOR]
See abstract
In this paper, Goetze presents the edition of two tablets kept in the Oriental Museum of the University of Urbana, Ill. (UIOM 2134, 2370), reporting texts describing itineraries of the Akkadian period.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Güterbock, Hans Gustav
1951-1952 “The Song of Ullikummi: Revised Text of the Hittite Version of a Hurrian Myth”
JCS 5 (1951) pp. 135-161; 6 (1952) pp. 8-42.
See full text [JSTOR: Part 1]
See full text [JSTOR: Part 2]
See abstract
This paper (published in two issues of the same periodic), offers a new edition of the Hittite version (found in the Hittite capital) of the so-called “Song of Ullikummi”, a part of a mythological saga regarding the Hurrian god Kumarbi (the main deity of Urkesh).
[mDP – July 2019]


1954-1955 “The Hurrian Element in the Hittite Empire,”
CHM 2/2, pp. 383-394.
Paris : Librairie des Meridiens.
See full text [1997 reprint in AS26]
See abstract
The author exposes in this paper the main Hurrian influences on the Hittite culture, mostly focusing on the Hittite Imperial period.
[mDP – July 2019]


1965 “A Votive Sword with Old Assyrian Inscription,”
Assyriological Studies 16, pp. 197-198.
Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
See full text
See abstract
The present author publishes in this paper a bronze sword kept in a private collection in Europe (anonymous owner), said to come from the vicinity of Diyarbakir.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Hallo, William W.
1962 “The Royal Inscriptions of Ur: A Typology,”
HUCA 33, pp. 1-43.
See full text [JSTOR]
See abstract
The present contribution deals with the definition of the nature and the classification of Sumerian texts from Ur.
[mDP – July 2019]


1964 “The Road to Emar,”
JCS 18, pp. 57-88.
See full text [JSTOR]
See abstract
Trades and commercial routes were always a key topic in the research about ancient Mesopotamia. Hallo offers in this paper the integration of the text of tablet YBC 4499 to previous material edited by Goetze in 1953, reporting ancient Mesopotamian itinerary texts.
[mDP – July 2019]


1978 “Simurrum and the Hurrian Frontier,”
Revue Hittite et asianique 36, pp. 71-83.
See full text
See abstract
The paper starts with the definition of the first Hurrian settlement ever attested, the so-called area of “Urkesh and Nawar”, of the late Sargonic period (ca. 22nd century BC).
[mDP – October 2019]

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Hawkins, John David
2007 “Hurrian,”
in Postgate, J.N. (ed.), Languages of Iraq, Ancient and Modern
Cambridge: University Press [on behalf of the British School of Archaeology in Iraq], pp. 73-84.
See full text
See abstract
Within a brief overview of the historical setting of documents written in Hurrian, ample room is given to the Tish-atal and Atal-shen inscriptions, from which a date in the Ur III period is given as possible on the basis of both “style and paleography%#148 and the possible correlation with Tish-atal of Nineveh.
[gB – April 2008]

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Hijara, Ismail
in press Prehistoric Pottery from the Surface Collection of the 1985 Regional Survey.
to appear in Urkesh/Mozan Studies.

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Hrouda, Barthel
1958 “Waššukanni, Urkiš, Šubat-Enlil. Ein Beitrag zur historischen Geographie des nördlichen Zweistromlandes,”
MDOG 90, pp. 22-35.
See full text
See abstract
The author reports firstly in this paper the history of the excavations undertaken mostly at Tell Halaf, Chagar Bazar, Tell Brak, Tell Sheik Hamad, Abu Bekr, Tell Fekheriye, Tell Khuera and Tell Ailun (other surveys are also reported on p. 24, including Tell Qabr-el-Kebir, Qabr-es-Seghir, Abu Rasain, cAin-elcAbd, Segar Tahtani, Segar Foqani, Nabhane, Chass and Tell Ailun).
[mDP – October 2019]

1985
“Zum Problem der Hurriter,”
MARI 4, pp. 595-613

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Kessler, Karlheinz
1980 Untersuchungen zur historischen Topographie Nordmesopotamiens
Wiesbaden: L. Reichert.
Publisher webpage

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Kupper, Jean-Robert
1998 Lettres royales du temps de Zimri-Lim.
Archives Royales de Mari, 28.
Paris: Éditions Recherches sur les Civilisations.

See abstract
Two individuals who appear in these letters are qualified as “man of Urkesh”, Terru and Haziran. We have several letters written directly by Terru to Zimri-Lim. From the context, we may safely assume that Terru was the “king” of Urkesh, even though neither the term LUGAL nor the term endan is attested for him. It is possible that Haziran, too, may be considered a king of Urkesh, but with a higher degree of uncertainty.
[gB – June 2002]

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Lawler, Andrew
2008 “Who Were the Hurrians?”
Archaeology 61/4 (July-August 2008).
See full text
See abstract
Lawler presents a brief overview about the excavation at Urkesh, described as a town inhabitated by the Hurrians, “a little-known people fueled the rise of civilization”. The article briefly presents the vast plaza and the impressive stone stairway related to the temple complex.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Lewy, Hildegard
1971 “Assyria c. 2600-1816 B.C.,”
CAH 1/2, pp. 729-770.
Cambridge : University Press.
See full text
See abstract
This chapter of the CAH (no. 25) is devoted to the presentation of the history of Assyria between ca. 2600 and 1816; the author deals with the pre-Sargonic period, the Sargonic-period, king-lists and chronology, the Old Assyrian period, the religion and the calendar.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Liverani, Mario
2003 The Ancient Near East. History, Society and Economy.
Routledge: London & New York.
See abstract
This is for sure one of the reference works about the history of the Ancient Near East, dealing also with aspects of historical economy of the ancient pre-classical world. Liverani leads the reader (throughout six chapters) from the very beginning of prehistory, the Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods, until the end of the Persian empire. Tell Mozan is quoted several times (pp. 117, 137, 154f.) as also Urkish (pp. 117, 137, 154, 170, 290).
[mDP – July 2019]

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Mallowan, Max E.L.
1937 “The Excavations at Tall Chagar Bazar and an Archaeological Survey of the Khabur Region, Second Campaign, 1936,”
Iraq 4.2, pp. 91-177.
See full text [JSTOR]
See abstract
This paper represents the final report of the second excavation season undertaken by M. Mallowan in 1936 at Tell Chagar Bazar, with a further survey in the Habur region.
[mDP – July 2019]


1947 “Excavations at Brak and Chagar Bazar,”
Iraq 9, pp. 1-259.
See full text [JSTOR]
See abstract
M. Mallowan presents in this contribution the results of the 1947 survey and excavation at Brak and Chagar Bazar.
[mDP – July 2019]


1971 “Early Dynastic Period in Mesopotamia,”
CAH 1/2, pp. 238-314.
Cambridge : University Press.
See full text [Archive.org]
See abstract
This chapter of the CAH [Cambridge Ancient History] (no. 16) is devoted to the presentation of the most important Early Dynastic Period sites in Mesopotamia.
[mDP – July 2019]


1977 Mallowan's Memoirs
New York : Dodd, Mead [reprinted in 2001: London: HarperCollins].
See full text [Archive.org]
See abstract
In this autobiographical book, M. Mallowan presents his archaeological experience in Syria and Mesopotamia from ca. 1926 to 1975.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Mellink, M.
1972-1975 “Hurriter Kunst,”
RLA 4, pp. 514-519.
See full text
See abstract
The author starts with the problem of the existence/not-existence of a mere Hurrian art tradition which was “advocated by some and rejected by others” (p. 514). In the conclusion (p. 518, § 8), Mellink states that “the negation of Hurrian art is unfounded, but the existence of an original, independent tradition of Hurrian art and architecture is improbable for lack of a strong, lasting dynastic center which could have sponsored continuity”.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Michalowski, P.
2003 “An Early Dynastic Tablet of ED Lu A from Tell Brak (Nagar),”
CDLJ, 2003-003, 6 pages.
See full text
See abstract
Edition of an ED III tablet fragment from Nagar with lines 115-122 of the lexical list ED LU A.
[gB – March 2003]

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Milano, Lucio, Walther Sallaberger, Philippe Talon and Karel Van Lerberghe
2004 Third Millennium Cuneiform Texts from Tell Beydar (Seasons 1996-2002).
Subartu 12.
Turnout: Brepols.
See abstract
This volume presents eight contribution about cuneiform texts from Tell Beydar, all dating to the Third millennium BC and found during 1996-2002 excavation season.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Minunno, Giuseppe
2009 “Da Urkeš ad Emar. Note sull'abi
in Paola Negri Scafa and Salvatore Viaggio (eds.), Dallo Stirone allo Tigri, dal Tevere all'Eufrate,
Studi in onore di Claudio Saporetti,
Roma: Aracne, pp. 283-293.
See full text
The author presents in this contribution a discussion about the structure and the function of the Urkesh's necromantic pit known as abi, crossing the archeological evidence with later Hurro-Hittite rituals.
[mDP – December 2019]

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Moortgat Anton and Ursula Moortgat-Correns
1976 Tell Chuēra in Nordost-Syrien.
Vorläufiger Bericht über die Siebente Grabunskampagne 1974.

Berlin: Gebr. Mann Verlag.
See full text
The authors present in this volume the main results of the 1974 excavation season at Tell Chuera.
[mDP – January 2020]

1978 Tell Chuēra in Nordost-Syrien.
Vorläufiger Bericht über die Achte Grabunskampagne 1976.

Berlin: Gebr. Mann Verlag.
See full text
The authors present in this volume the main results of the 1976 excavation season at Tell Chuera.
[mDP – January 2020]

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Nadali, Davide
2019 “Miniatures of Wars: Fights, Skirmishes and Conflicts in Ancient Near Eastern Seals,”
in SANEM 3, pp. 317-322.
See full text
“Starting from two seal impressions from Tell Mozan, ancient Urkeš (Syria), this paper presents and discusses some Near Eastern seals from Syria and Mesopotamia whose iconography is related to war or warlike scenes. The figurative theme resembles the narrative representations of war in major monuments (such as bas-reliefs on wall panels and steles) – or vice versa? – with a clear selection of culminating moments due to the restricted surface that the seal can offer. Because of the similarity with major visual monuments, what is the meaning of and reason for carving scenes of warfare on ancient seals? The question of visibility and circulation of the theme of war and victory in ancient Near Eastern societies, with all implications of the political and religious ideology of war, will be considered” (author's abstract on p. 317).
[mDP – August 2020]

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Nougayrol, Jean
1960 “Documents du Habur,”
Syria 37.3/4, pp. 205-214.
See full text
See abstract
In this paper Nougayrol publishes a new tablet belonging to Schaeffer's personal collection (Schaeffer 2), coming from the area of Ḫana and dating to Hammurabi's period, dealing with the selling of an orchard within the district of Qatuna. The orchard belonged to Abi-rapi, son of Gimil-sin and was purchased by Idin-aškur and Ḫalmu.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Orsi, Valentina
2010 “The Passage from the Early Bronze to the Middle Bronze Age in Jezirah: a Parallel between Tell Mozan and Tell Barri Ceramic Sequences”,
in P. Matthiae, F. Pinnock, L. Nigro, N. Marchetti (eds.), Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East. May, 5th-10th 2008, “Sapienza” – Università di Roma. Volume 1. Near Eastern archaeology in the Past, Present and Future. Heritage and Identity. Ethnoarchaeological and Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Visual Expression and Craft Production in the Definition of Social Relations and Status, Wiesbaden, pp. 863-881.
See full text
See abstract
The transition between the Early and the Middle Bronze Age in Syria is the focus of this contribution, focusing on the Jezirah area, offering a proposal for a (still lacking at that time) calibration of ceramic sequences based on Tell Mozan and Tell Barri excavations. The author defines ceramic diagnostic types as embedded in their original emplacement, trying to determine a functional analysis of the shapes.
[mDP – October 2019]

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Parayre, Dominique
1977 “L'Attribution de Sculptures aux Hurrites,”
in Barrelet 1977, pp. 115-208.

2000 “Les suidés dans le monde Syro-Mésopotamien aux époques historiques,”
Topoi, Suppl. 2, pp. 141-206.
See abstract
A paper devoted to the actual presence and the connected depictions on different artefacts of swines or boars; specifically, a boar portrayed on a sealing from Urkesh is also mentioned.
[gB – January 2003]

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Parrot, André
1948 “Depot Hurrite de Foundation,”
Musees de France (May), pp. 85-86.
Parrot presents in this contribution the publication of some Mesopotamian and North-Syrian materials, including the famous bronze foundation, lion-shaped nail holding a white-stone tablet inscribed with a dedication text (25 lines in Hurrian) of king Tiš-atal of Urkesh (AO 19937).
[mDP – November 2019]


1954 “Acquisitions et inédits du Musée de Louvre,”
Syria 31.1/2, pp. 1-13. See full text
See abstract
Parrot presents in this contribution the publication of some Mesopotamian and North-Syrian materials, including the famous bronze foundation, lion-shaped nail holding a white-stone tablet inscribed with a dedication text (25 lines in Hurrian) of king Tish-atal of Urkesh (AO 19937).
[mDP – July 2019]

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Parrot, André and Jean Nougayrol
1948 “Un document de foundation Hurrite,”
RA 42.1/2, pp. 1-20.
See full text [JSTOR]
See abstract
Parrot and Nougayrol deal respectively with the presentation of two correlated artefacts kept at the Louvre Museum: AO 19937 and AO 19938; the former is the lion-shaped broze nail keeping the latter, the white-stone tablet inscribed with a Hurrian text concerning the dedication of a temple to the god dPIRI.GAL (described by Nougayrol, on p. 14, as “la grande lionne”) by the king of Urkesh Tiš-atal (the name is read as Tišari in this paper).
[mDP – October 2019]

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Pecorella, Paolo Emilio
2000 “Note sulla produzione artistica hurrita e mitannica,”
La civiltà dei Hurriti. La Parola del Passato 55, pp. 349-365.
Napoli: Macchiaroli editore.
See abstract
This brief but important article deals with the question of specificity as it regards a style that might be properly called Hurrian. Some useful caveats are suggested in dealing with this complex issue, and on the whole the author is cautious about the possibility of providing a positive answer.
[gB – June 2002]

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Peyronel, Luca
2019 “Il ruggito del Leone. Qualche Osservazione sulle Immagini Ferine nel Mondo Siriano del III Millennio a.C.,”
in SANEM 3, pp. 323-334.
See full text
“The presence of the motif combining human figures fighting or killing a lion as attested since the Late Chalcolithict period in Mesopotamia. Apparently, different trajectories of the relationship between the beast and the kingship can be traced in the northern and southern regions. The domain over the chaotic wild nature is only one aspect of what was a multifaceted ideological interaction imbued by differentiated cultural meanings, as testified by the early association of the beast with deities – and above all Ishtar – in Mesopotamia and with specific king's prerogatives in Syria. The rich evidence from Ebla and Urkesh here reviewed is therefore particularly important for the definition of various meanings of the lion's image in the SYrian cultures during the 3rd millennium BC” (author's abstract on p. 323).
[mDP – August 2020]

Pfälzner, Peter
2008 “Das Tempeloval von Urkeš.
Betrachtungen zur Typologie und Entwicklungsgeschichte der mesopotamischen Ziqqurrat im 3. Jt. v. Chr,”

Zeitschrift für Orient-Archäologie 1, pp. 396-433.
See full text
See abstract
The author presents in this publication the results about the reconstruction and comparison of the 'Tempeloval' of Urkesh, after the excavation seasons of the DOG in 1998-2001.
[mDP – July 2019]


2012 “The Question of Desurbanisation versus Reurbanisation of the Syrian Jezirah in the Late Third and Early Second Millennium BC,”
in N. Laneri, P. Pfälzner, S. Valentini (eds.),
Looking North. The Socioeconomic Dynamics of Northern Mesopotamian and Anatolian Regions during the Late Third and Early Second Millennium BC.
Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, pp. 51-80.
See full text [Propylaeum]
Alternative online version [Academia.edu]
See abstract
The paper aims at discussing and reinterpreting the paradigm of the “collapse” of cities in Syria at the end of the Third and the Early Second millennium BC., taking into account the peculiar situation of the site of Urkesh/Tell Mozan, in the light of the excavations and the geomagnetic prospections performed by the German team of the Deutsche Orient-Gesellschaft (DOG), in 1998-2003.
[mDP – January 2019]

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Pfälzner, Peter and Anne Wissing
2004 Urbanismus in der Unterstadt von Urkeš.
Ergebnisse einer geomagnetischen Prospektion und eines archäologischen Surveys in der südöstlichen Unterstadt von Tall Mozan im Sommer 2002.

MDOG 136, pp. 41-86.

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Postgate, J. Nicholas (ed.)
2007 Languages of Iraq, Ancient and Modern.
Cambridge: University Press [on behalf of the British School of Archaeology in Iraq].
See full text
See abstract
The volume collects nine contributions related to the many languages spoken in ancient times and today in Iraq: Sumerian, Babylonian and Assyrian, Hurrian, Early Aramaic, Medieval and Modern Aramaic, Neo-Aramaic, Iraqi Arabic, Kurdish and Iraqi Turkman.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Raccidi, Mattia
2014 “Models of Covered Wagons from Tell Mozan/Urkesh,”
Annali Università degli Studi di Napoli 'L’Orientale', Vol. 74, pp. 1-16.
See full text
See abstract
The contribution presents an investigation about four fragments of terracotta models of covered vehicles found at Tell Mozan/Urkesh, dating back to the 3rd millennium BC and belonging to the so-called “Type VI – Four-wheeled covered vehicle”. The author presents a comparison of this material with other artefacts found in other sites of Syria, Southern Anatolia and Northern Mesopotamia. The four fragments found at Urkesh were labelled as J3q901.1, J02q616-p1, J02q608-p13 and A10.46.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Riehl, Simone
2000 “Erste Ergebnisse der archäobotanischen Untersuchungen in der zentralen Oberstadt von Tall Mozan/Urkeš im Rahmen der DOG-IIMAS-Kooperation,”
MDOG 132, pp. 229-238.
See full text
See abstract
This paper offers an overview on archaeobotanical remains found at Urkesh during IIMAS (1984-) and DOG excavations (1998-), mostly from excavation in grave-spot C2, during 1999 excavation season.
[mDP – October 2019]

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Rinaldi, Giovanni
1968 Le letterature antiche del Vicino Oriente.
Firenze: Sansoni and Milano: Accademia.
See abstract
The volume is a miscellanea of texts from the ancient Near East, presented in chronological order and divided into traditional cultures.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Robinson, Spencer M.
2006 “Following a False Trail – The Search for the Hittites,”
in al-Rafidan. Journal of Western Asiatic Studies 27, pp. 101-116.
See full text [Academia.edu]
See abstract
The attempt of this paper is to reshape the concepts of 'culture' and 'ethnicity', questioning previous interpretations related to cultures labelled as 'Hittite' and 'Hurrian'.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Rova, Elena
2013 “Review to: Bianchi, Alice 2012, Comparative Studies on the Pottery of Sector AK of the Royal Building in Tall Mozan/Urkeš (Syria), Studien zur Urbanisierung Nordmesopotamiens Supplement Serie D Band 2, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz.
Wiener Zeitschrift für die Kunde des Morgenlandes 103, pp. 409-412.
See full text
“For many reasons, this volume is a must for any scholar interested in the archaeology of 3rd millennium Upper Mesopotamia. First of all, it represents the first analytical presentation of a late 3rd millennium BC stratified ceramic corpus from the Khabur region. It therefore fills an important gap in the relative chronology of the area, which even in the most recent published synthesis [...] remained rather vague, due to the dearth of well published available material. Secondly, it offers an example of careful and rigorous analysis of a large corpus of data, and provides a clear, well-structured and up-to-date synthesis of the topic, of which all future publications [...] will undoubtedly take much profit. Finally, it is very carefully produced, excellently illustrated, almost free from mistakes and, considering that it consists of more than 700 pages and that it contains a number of colour plates, not excessively expensive” (p. 409).
{Review to Bianchi 2012}.
[mDP – November 2022]

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Sallaberger, Walther
2004 “Women at Beydar,”
in Subartu 12
The data from the Beydar tablets about the “female servant/slave” of a woman called Uqnitum are summarized on p. 46.
[mDP – November 2019]

2007 “From Urban Culture to Nomadism: a History of Upper Mesopotamia in the Late Third Millennium,”
in Catherine Kuzucuoğlu and Catherine Marro (eds), Sociétés humaines et changement climatique à la fin du troisième millénaire : une crise a-t-elle eu lieu en Haute Mésopotamie ? Actes du Colloque de Lyon, 5-8 décembre 2005,
Varia Anatolica 19, Paris: De Boccard Edition-Diffusion, pp. 417-456.
See full text
“This article reviews the written sources of the history of Upper Mesopotamia from the time of the archives of Ebla (24th century BC) until the end of the Third Millennium BC. The objective is to define with precision, in terms of space and time, the regions of interest and political control of the different Mesopotamian dynasties or their rulers. At the time of Ebla's archives (24th century BC), the plains of Upper Mesopotamia caned the development of a blossoming urban culture; agriculture and animal husbandry were organized by the cities. A half a century later, however, according to the texts from Mari (18th century BC), large sectors of the Khabur triangle lost most of their urban centers; and the nomads took control of the territory. During several wars between Ebla, Nagar, Mari and 'Kish', urban life is considerably reduced. Upper Mesopotamia, especially the eastern Khabur with Nagar, and the Upper Tigris basin are integrated into the Sargonid Empire. Later, Urkish seems to have taken a major role (22ndcentury BC). At the time of the 3rd Dynasty of Ur (2110-2003 BC), the most important cities were indeed Mari, Ebla, Urshu and Shimanum; other urban centers appear mainly along the valleys of the Tigris and the Euphrates. The northern plains have now lost their political importance, in strong contrast with the regions which surround them. These plains are known as the 'Amorite land' during the Paleobabylonian period, and as it is demonstrated by this article, this region was probably already designated under this term at the time of Ur III. The process of disappearance of urban centers at the end of the Third Millennium BC suggests that Upper Mesopotamia was the ethnogenesis-site of the Amorite nomads” [English translation by mDP from the author's original summary in French].
[mDP – February 2020]

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Salvini, Mirjo
1996 “Excursus: The Name Tupkiš,”
Wiener Zeitschrift für die Kunde des Moregenlandes 86 [= Buccellati, G. and Kelly-Buccellati 1996a], pp. 84-91 (bibliography included).
See full text
An excursus about the origin and meaning of the name of king Tupkiš of Urkesh/Tell Mozan.
[mDP – October 2022]

1998 “The Earliest Evidence of the Hurrians Before the Formation of the Reign of Mittanni,”
UMS 3, pp. 99-115.
See full text
“The Mesopotamian plain is bound to the north and east by the mountain ranges of the eastern Taurus and the Zagros. In the vast fertile area of the foothills, from the second half of the third millennium, the Hurrian ethnic element begins to appear. We may rely on two kinds of sources in reconstructing the earliest history of the Hurrians, a nonSemitic and non-Indo-European people: historical accounts of the Sumerian-Semitic civilizations and documents of the local political formations. Both are written at the beginning in Sumerian-Akkadian cuneiform script which, from the third millennium on, represented an universal means of communication. In fact, at a very early date the Hurrians began to write their historical records also in their own language. Having entered the cultural sphere of the Mesopotamian civilizations, the Hurrians, from the very start, can be seen to have had a bilingual culture: Sumero-Akkadian and Hurrian. The first documents registering their existence are names of people connected with political formations and place-names which provide material for historical geographical research” [Author's Introduction, p. 99]
[mDP – July 2022]

2000a “La civiltà dei Hurriti, popolo delll'Asia anteriore antica.
Introduzione alla storia degli studi e alla documentazione testuale,”

La civiltà dei Hurriti. La Parola del Passato 55, pp. 7-24.
Napoli: Macchiaroli editore.
See abstract
The inscription of Tish-atal (which is also shown on the cover of the volume) is the most ancient Hurrian document, and it can now be said to come from Tell Mozan.
[mDP – July 2019]


2000b “Le più antiche testimonianze dei Hurriti prima della formazione del regno di Mittanni,”
La civiltà dei Hurriti. La Parola del Passato 55, pp. 25-67.
Napoli: Macchiaroli editore.
See abstract
Salvini presents in this paper some clues about the first attestations of Hurrian people along the Mediterranean coast, firstly at Alalaḫ and then also at Ugarit.
[gB – June 2002]

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Salzman, Roz
2020 “Volume of Studies Honors Giorgio Buccellati and Marilyn Kelly-Buccellati,”
in Backdirt 2020 (December) Archaeology and Pandemics, pp. 9-11.
See full text
The paper presents the recently published Festschrift in Honour of Giorgio Buccellati and Marilyn Kelly-Buccellati, Between Syria and the Highlands. Studies in Honor of Giorgio Buccellati & Marilyn Kelly-Buccellati (edited by S. Valentini and G. Guarducci), Studies on the Ancient Near East and the Mediterranean 3 [= SANEM 3], Roma: Arbor Sapientiae Editore, 2019 [Full PDF]. The author, after a brief description of the content of the volume, stresses the main features of archaeological and philological activities of the Buccellatis, underlining their peculiar approach on archaeology in disseminating historical knowledge under many perspectives and through different channels.
[mDP – March 2021]

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Schmidt, Conrad
2012 Ausgrabungen 1998-2001 in der Zentralen Oberstadt von Tall Mozan/Urkeš
Die Keramik der Früh-Jazira V- bis Alt-Jazira II-Zeit.

Studien zur Urbanisierung Nordmesopotamiens Serie A, Band 4. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz.
See full text [JSTOR]
Table of contents
“This publication is based on the pottery from a section of the levels of the excavations of the central upper city of Tell Mozan/Urkes in Northeastern Syria. The excavations were carried out between 1998 and 2001 by the Deutsche-Orient-Gesellschaft (DOG), Berlin under the supervision of Peter Pfälzner, University of Tübingen, and in cooperation with Giorgio Buccellati and Marilyn Kelly-Buccellati, International Institute for Mesopotamian Area Studies (IIMAS), Los Angeles. The pottery examined here dates to the transitional period between the end of the Early Bronze Age and the start of the Middle Bronze Age” (from author's abstract on p.XXIII).
[mDP – January 2020]

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Schwemer, Daniel
2001 Die Wettergottgestalten Mesopotamiens und Nordsyriens im Zeitalter der Keilschriftkulturen.
Materialien und Studien nach den schriftlichen Quellen.

Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz.
See full text
See abstract
In this publication, dealing with the nature and characteristics of Syro-Mesopotamian divinities, the author mentions Urkesh/Tell Mozan on two occasions (pp. 445, 619: spelled as Urgiš/Tall Mawzan), reporting text from this site to describe the important role played in this city by the polyad god Kumarbi.
[mDP – December 2019]

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Sedláček, Tibor
2012 “Podzemná štruktúra v Urkeši,”
in Lukáš Pecha (ed.), Materiální a duchovní kultura Východu v promĕnách času,
Plzeň: Západočeská univerzita v Plzni, 378, pp. 66-76.
See full text
See abstract
This paper in Czechoslovak summarises many aspects on Urkesh/Tell Mozan: in the introduction, the author retrieves the path toward the identification of the ancient site with the modern tell; then, the most relevant structures are briefly described, in connection with contemporary and later textual sources.
[mDP – October 2019]


2014 “The mythological background of three seal impressions found in Urkesh,”
Religio: Revue pro religionistiku 22.1, pp. 29-53.
See full text
See abstract
The author presents in this paper three seal impressions found at tell Mozan/Urkesh, in the area of the royal palace: A5q680.o (an 'Etana' type motif sealing), A1.483 (a sealing presenting a double-face god with a typical divine, horned, conical headgear), and a last seal impression, whose no. is not provided.
[mDP – July 2019]


2017 Doklady raného níboženstva Churritov v starovekom Urkeši,
Opera Facultatis Philosophicae Universitatis Masarykianae
[Spisy Filozofické Fakulty Masarykovy Univerzity] 470, Brno: Muni Press.
See full text (only introduction)
See abstract
Discoveries from Tell Mozan in north-eastern Syria and their place in the overall historical and cultural context of the ancient Near East make an important contribution towards understanding religiosity and culture in general, not only in this city, but also in a wider regional context.
[mDP – October 2019]

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Smogorzewska, Anna
2010 “Andirons from Tell Arbid. Archaeological and Ethnoarchaeological Study,” Centre d'archéologie mediterranéenne de l'Academie Polonaise des Sciences. Études et Travaux 22, pp. 141-155.
See full text [Academia.edu]
See abstract
     Describes some horseshoe-shaped hearths and props. Two complete andirons are found in an ED III/Akkadian context (p. 143), one of them with three pierced knobs on the inside. Another from the Late Ninevite 5 priod was found in a room with evidence of “post-consupmption bone remains and drinking vessels with pointed bases”.
[gB – September 2010]

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Sollberger, Edmond and Jean-Robert Kupper
1971 Inscriptions royales sumeriénnes et akkadiennes.
Paris: Éditions du Cerf.

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Speiser, Ephraim Avigdor
1930 Mesopotamian Origins. The Basic Population of the Near East.
Philadelphia, London: University of Pennsylvania Press, Humphrey Milford, Oxford University Press.
See full text [Archive.org]
See abstract
In this volume, Speiser retraces the different cultures who inhabited the Mesopotamia and its neighbouring areas.
[mDP – July 2019]


1953 The Hurrian Participation in the Civilization of Mesopotamia, Syria and Palestine.
CHM 1.2, pp. 311-327.
[reprinted in J.J. Finkelstein and M. Greenberg, Oriental and Biblical Studies: Collected Writings of E. A. Speiser, Philadelphia 1967, pp. 244-269].
See full text (reprint) [JSTOR]
“The ethno-linguistic group now commonly recognized as Hurrian has been known as such to modern scholarship for only slightly over a quarter of a century. Nevertheless, within this short space of time the Hurrians have re-emerged as one of the vital factors in the composite civilization of the ancient Near-East. Their prominence, in one way or another, is attested by a variety of written records which date from shortly after the middle of the third millennium to the early centuries of the first millennium B.C.” (p. 244 [reprint]).
[mDP – January 2020]

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Stein, Diana L.
2001 “Nuzi Glyptic: The Eastern Connection,”
in William W. Hallo and Irene J. Winter (eds.), Seals and Seal Impressions: Proceedings of the XLVe Rencontre Assyriologique Internationale (Part II),
Yale University, Bethesda (MD.): CDL, pp. 149-183.
See full text [Academia.edu]
See abstract
While the connection of Nuzi glyptic with the Zagros is the primary focus of the article, the author deals with the question of Hurrian identity and Hurrian style, and refers to Urkesh on pp. 150-152.
[gB – December 2005]

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Stillinger, Michele D., Joshua M. Feinberg and Ellery Frahm
2015 “Refining the Archaeomagnetic Dating Curve for the Near East: New Intensity Data from Bronze Age Ceramics at Tell Mozan, Syria,”
Journal of Archaeological Science 53, pp. 345-355.
See full text
See abstract
This paper aims at redefining the chronology of Urkesh and other sites through the medium of archaeomagnetic analyses.
[mDP – October 2019]

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Thureau-Dangin, François
1912 “Tablette de Samarra,”
RA 11, pp. 1-14.
See full text [JSTOR]
See abstract
Thureau-Dangin publishes a bronze/copper tablet (today at the Louvre Museum: AO 5678) found, according to the seller's words, at Samarra. The tablet is inscribed in Akkadian, paleographically datable between the Akkad period and the Ur III period, on a face and on a side, on a total of 21 lines.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Uberti, Maria Luisa
2005 Introduzione alla storia del Vicino Oriente antico.
Bologna: il Mulino.
See abstract
This book has been conceived has a companion or a summarized version of Liverani 2000 [see supra] in telling, in a brief version, the history of the Ancient Near East from the Early Bronze Age (3000-2000 BC) until the Iron Age (1200-550 BC). A premise is added in the introduction, presenting the history of the first explorations in the area, the languages of the Ancient Near East and the main textual sources.
[mDP – July 2019]

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van Ginneken, Paul
2000 “De Hurrieten van Tell Mozan,”
Spiegel Historiael 6, Issue 35, pp. 262-269.
See full text
See abstract
In this paper, in Dutch, the author summarizes in detail the paths of the excavations at Tell Mozan/Urkesh, undertaken by Buccellati and Kelly-Buccellati, starting from 1984 onwards.
[mDP – November 2019]

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van Liere, Willem J. and Jean Lauffray
1954-1955 “Nouvelle prospection archéologique dans la haute Jezireh Syrienne,”
AAS 4-5, pp. 129-148.

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Viscuso, Salvatore, Alessandra Zanelli and Marta Barozzi
2018 “Textiles and Archaeological Sites: Towards a Methodology for Designing Lightweight Protective Structures,”
in S. Di Salvo, (ed.), Adaptive Materials Research for Architecture, (Advanced Materials Research 1149), Zurich: Scientific.Net, 2018, pp. 109-118.
DOI
See full text
See abstract
The paper discusses about the development of the best-fitting shelters used to cover (temporally or for long-time) archaeological sites, taking in consideration three main goals: 1) the protection of the archaeological structures; 2) a support to the archaeologist during their field word; 3) a complete and well achievable fruition of the archaeological remains to the visitors.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Volk, Konrad
2004 “Beschriftete Objekte aus Tall Mozan/Urkeš,”
MDOG 136, pp. 87-101.
See full text [Propylaeum]
See abstract
This contribution aims at publishing some inscribed materials found at Tell Mozan starting from 1998 German excavations (DOG) on the site.
[mDP – July 2019]

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von Dassow, Eva
2008 State and Society in the Late Bronze Age. Alalaḫ Under the Mittani Empire.
SCCNH vol. 17.
Bethesda (MD): CDL Press.
See abstract
This comprehensive and insightful study on the period that corresponds to the final phase of occupation at Urkesh includes an important section on the question of ethnicity (pp. 68-90), with special reference to the “Hurrians and Hurrianization”.
[gB – January 2009]

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Wegner, Ilse
1981 Gestalt und Kult der Ištar-Šawuška in Kleinasien.
AOAT 36.
Kevelaer: Butzon & Bercker.
See abstract
This book is completely devoted to the presentation of the features and cult of the goddess Ištar-Šawuška in Asia Minor.
[mDP – July 2019]


2000 Einführung in die hurritische Sprache.
Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag.
See preview on Google Books[2nd revised edition, 2007]
See abstract
This grammar of the Hurrian language is divided into four sections: 1) an introduction about chronology, geography and dialects; 2) an introduction to the grammar; typology of the Hurrian language, script and phonetic, morphology, syntax, a paragraph about 'Althurritisch' and some textual specimens; analysis of some texts; indexes.
[mDP – November 2019]

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Weiss, Harvey
2000 “Beyond the Younger Dryas. Collapse as Adaptation to Abrupt Climate Change in Ancient West Asia and the Eastern Mediterranean,”
in Garth Bawden and Richard M. Reycraft (eds.), Environmental Disaster and the Archaeology of Human Response, (Maxwell Museum of Anthropology), Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, pp. 75-98.
See full text [Academia.edu]
See abstract
Akkadian administrative fortresses were established in northern Mesopotamia and subsequently extended into a network exploiting the dry-farming plains that surround southern Mesopotamia: Susa, Kirkuk (Nuzi), Erbil (Arbilu), Mosul (Ninua), and the eastern Habur Plains (Leilan/Shekhna/Apum, Mozan/Urkesh, and Brak/Nagar).
[gB – January 2002]

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Whiting, Robert McCray, Jr.
1976 “Tiš-atal of Nineveh and Babati, Uncle of Šu-Sin,”
JCS 28, pp. 173-182.
See full text [JSTOR]
See abstract
Whiting devotes this contribution to the presentation of a tablet from Tell Asmar (ancient Eshunna), bearing the field no. 1931-T615, found in an area of the southwest of the palace complex (findspot L 32:3), dating to the 3rd year of Šu-Sin.
[mDP – July 2019]

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Wilhelm, Gernot
1982 Grundzüge der Geschichte und Kultur der Hurriter.
Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft.
See full text
See abstract
Wilhelm devotes this volume to the displaying (through 5 chapters) of the culture of the Hurrians.
[mDP – July 2019]


1998 “Die Inschrift des Tišatal von Urkeš,”
in Bibliotheca Mesopotamica 26 BM 26 = UMS 3, pp. 117-146 (with 3 plates: XIII-XV).
See full text
See abstract
In this contribution, Wilhem re-edit the inscription of Tišatal king of Urkeš, inscribed in Hurrian on a stone tablet kept at the Louvre Museum (AO19938), the one related to the bronze lion-shaped foundation nail (AO19937), both coming from Urkesh, the cultic centre of the god Kumarbi.
[mDP – July 2019]


2001 “Hurritisch naipti 'Weidung', 'Weide' oder eine bestimmte Art von Weide,”
in Thomas Richter, Doris Prechel, Jörg Klinger (eds.), Kulturgeschichten. Altorientalische Studien für Volkert Haas zum 65. Geburtstag, Saarbrücken: Saarbrücker Druckerei und Verlag, pp. 449-453.
See abstract
The Hurrian root na(w/v)- is likely to be the one from which Nawar is derived, the term used for the hinterland of Urkesh in the inscription of Atal-shen, the identification as Nagar being unlikely.
[gB – June 2002]


2008 “Hurrians in the Kültepe Texts,”
in Dercksen 2008, Anatolia and the Jazira, pp. 181-194.
See full text
Alternative online version [Academia.edu]
Referring to the Urkesh evidence that supports an early presence of the Hurrians in the northern Jazira, Wilhelm says that it “coincides well with this writer's argument that Hurrian anthroponymy points at a long 'Sprachbund' situation between Hurrian and ancient Semitic languages, because Hurrian shares a certain type of sentence names with Akkadian, Amorite and Canaanite” (p. 181).
[gB – January 2009]


2015 “Urkeš,”
in Reallexikon der Assyriologie, Vol. 14 (5/6), pp. 417-418.
See full text
Online version
A general introduction to Urkeš/Tell Mozan, discussing about its name, history, excavations, and its main archaeological materials (mostly seals and sealings).
[mDP – June 2022]

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Wissing, Anne
2012 “Ritual Aspects of Middle Bronze Age Burial Practices in the Hurrian City of Urkesh,”
in Peter Pfälzner, Herbert Niehr, Ernst Pernicka and Anne Wissing (eds.),
(Re-)constructing funerary rituals in the ancient Near East,
Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, pp. 111-121.
Publisher webpage
Table of contents

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Zick, Michael
2008 Türkei. Wiege der Zivilisation, (AOAT 36),
Stuttgart: Konrad Theiss Verlag.
See abstract
A popular book about Turkey, it includes a richly illustrated chapter on the Hurrians, entitled “The kingdom of the unknown culture builders”, which gives pride of place to Urkesh (“Urkisch”).
[gB – April 2009]

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